Welcome to the Website of nuClock!

nuClock is a European project headed for an ambitious goal: the development of a scientific clock that reaches a much higher precision compared to the best clocks that are operated today in some of the world’s finest laboratories. While such clocks use the electrons of an atom as the “pendulum”, we will use the nucleus of a very special atom – Thorium-229 – for setting the rhythm. Once we get our clock working, it can be employed aboard navigation satellites, it can help to synchronize networks, and it might lead astronomers to a better understanding of the universe.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 664732. It will run from 2015 to 2019. Stay with us: it’s sure going to be exciting!

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NEWS

nuClock arts collaboration

No joke: there exist peer-reviewed journals on arts! The publications look just like science publications: title, author list, abstract, acknowledgements, list of reference... plus the well-beloved discussions with reviewers. Anyways, the most reputated journal covering the interface between science, technology, and arts is probably Leonardo Magazine, published by MIT Press. This is where we published a study on one of the two projects that nuClock associate Kerstin Ergenzinger is currently working…

New paper by the LMU group

Over the two years, the LMU Munich group has established the detection of internal conversion (IC) electrons as a successful technique to detect the Th-229 isomer. This scheme as already been used to measure the half-life of the isomer in the neutral charge state, but the really important experiment, a measurement of the isomer energy, is still pending. Such an experiment would need to measure the kinetic energy of the IC electron released in the isomer decay. The LMU team just made an important…

Welcome Kjeld Beeks

A new PhD student joined the nuClock team! Kjeld Beeks from Eindhoven University of Technology just started his PhD in the Vienna group. He will work towards optical excitation and optical detection of the Th-229 isomer transition. Good luck with this challenging work, Kjeld!  

Two new papers from Heidelberg

Adriana's theory group just published two new papers, both of which might have a significant impact on experiments building on the Th-229 isomer. The first paper is a study on a new optomechanical system, which interfaces optical fields and X-rays via an optical cavity. In short, one mirror of an optical cavity is formed by a micro-cantilever, which bears a layer of Th-229 nuclei. These can be excited by X-rays, which impart momentum to the cantilever and change its quantum state, thereby changing…

Theory papers to support experiments

We have built up a considerable backlog in out presentation of papers related to research on the thorium isomer. Here, we highlight a number of theoretical papers that could support experiments searching for the isomer and trying to measure its energy. "Magnetic hyperfine structure of the ground-state doublet in highly charged ions 229 Th 89+, 87+ and the Bohr-Weisskopf effect" by E. V. Tkalya and A. V. Nikolaev, published with Phys. Rev. C, link. "Bound internal conversion versus nuclear excitation…

LMU grant proposal accepted

Frontier research builds on solid funding, and the LMU groups just secured financial support for their upcoming research work. Within the framework of a DFG grant, an electron spectrometer to measure the energy of IC electrons will be constructed. The money is sufficient to buy all the required equipment and LMU researcher Benedict Seiferle will be paid for another three years.   Congratulations to the LMU team!

Announcement 2017 yearly meeting

The nuClock yearly meeting 2017 will take place in Heidelberg from September 18 to 20 and will be hosted by Adriana's group. We will start on Monday after lunch (such that no-one needs to travel on Sunday already) and conclude on Wednesday afternoon. As with previous meetings, we are aiming for a large number of highly specialized talks and vivid discussions. More details willl follow as we are getting closer to the meeting.

Thorium research down under

We just learned about a new Thorium experiment, the first one in the Southern hemisphere! At CSIRO/Griffith University, researchers are currently transforming an already existing Yb ion trap to a Th ion trap. What a brilliant idea! The experiment is based in Brisbane (that's in the South East corner of Queensland), so if you happen do be around or would like to learn more about the experiment, contact Stephen Gensemer or Marcin Piotrowski directly. In a few years' time, we will have Th nuclear clocks…